Don't wait and worry - we're here for you

While coronavirus continues, that doesn’t mean cancer has gone away. It still needs to be treated with the same urgency as before. Our GP practices and hospitals, in common with all other NHS services, have taken and continue to take a range of measures to ensure they are safe for people to attend. It’s vital to seek advice about any new or unexplained symptoms and to attend any appointments and referrals you are given.

Symptoms to look out for:

  • unexplained bleeding
  • lumps
  • extreme tiredness
  • pain
  • night sweats
  • any other changes to your health

Any new symptoms, or a change to existing symptoms, should always be brought to the attention of a GP or another appropriate healthcare professional.

Dr Ruth Grabham, CCG Medical Director, says:copy_Ruth_Grabham.jpg

“The thing my GP colleagues and I want to stress the most is that our services are available, our practices are safe, and we really want to hear from anyone worried about their health."

“Whether it’s bleeding, a new lump or something else that just doesn’t feel right, let us know so that we can look into it and arrange further help, as putting it off will only make whatever the issue is more difficult to treat in the long run."

 

Booking an appointment

The NHS is constantly implementing new and innovative methods of delivering care in a way that protects staff, patients and their families and carers from any potential exposure to coronavirus. Patient safety remains the number one priority of the NHS, which is why some services may look and feel different since the last time you needed to use them.

You can contact your GP surgery by:

  • Visiting their website and using the online booking system
  • Calling the practice reception team
  • Using the NHS App

The app is also useful for checking symptoms and ordering repeat prescriptions.

Your GP appointment will likely be by telephone or video call They may then need to arrange for you to see a hospital clinician who specialises in your particular symptoms – usually within two weeks.

Read more about waiting times for cancer referrals and treatment.

 

Further support

A wealth of information, along with links to digital resources that can help with managing long-term conditions at home is available on the NHS UK website.

We are also working closely with the voluntary sector to support your health and wellbeing. See below a list of helpful resources.

The Cancer Care Map is a directory of local services that you can search via postcode.

Macmillan Cancer Support provide specialist support to anyone affected by cancer.

 

Dont wait and worry were here for you 2

Press releases

Don't wait and worry, says Macmillan GP